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Appendix B - Program Profile for the Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program


Table of Contents


Preamble

This program profile was developed during the course of the Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program (CSSP) Evaluation to provide a common basis for discussion. This document was written in accordance with Treasury Board Secretariat guidance on the development of a Results-based Accountability Framework (RMAF) concerning Program Profiles and includes a logic model based on "Results Chains" developed during the evaluation. However, this document does not constitute a complete RMAF and does not include a Monitoring and Evaluation Plan.

Program Profile

Context

The CSSP dates back to 1924-25, when regulations were developed in response to an epidemic of typhoid fever following the consumption of contaminated oysters in the United States, which involved 1500 cases and killed 150 people. Canada passed regulations under the Fish Inspection Act in 1925 that required that imported oysters be accompanied by a certificate showing that they were a "safe food product". The states of New York and Massachusetts extended certification requirements to shipments consigned to their markets and, in April of 1948, a formal agreement was signed between the two countries.

Initially, the Department of National Health and Welfare was the federal agency responsible for administering the 1948 agreement in Canada, and was responsible for:

  • Paralytic shellfish poison bio assays and recommendations for closures;
  • Certification of the British Columbia Shellfish Program;
  • Issuance of Plant certificates;
  • Surveys of shellfish growing areas in the Atlantic Provinces and Quebec.

The Department of Fisheries was responsible for:

  • Inspection of plants and products;
  • Management of paralytic shellfish poison control programs in the Atlantic Provinces and B.C.;
  • Inspection of U.S. imports;
  • Patrol of closed areas;
  • Preparation and promulgation of shellfish closure regulations;
  • Land surveys for installation of shellfish area closure boundary markers.

Responsibilities for shellfish control responsibilities were reassigned in 1971. Environment Canada (EC) assumed operational responsibility for all of the CSSP except for the bioassay portion of Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) control, which remained the responsibility of Health and Welfare Canada. EC (Fisheries Service) was designated the Canadian agency responsible for administering the 1948 agreement. In addition, EC was responsible for sanitary control of shellfish growing areas and harvesting and processing of shellfish in B.C.

In a subsequent reorganization in 1979, shellfish control activities were assigned to Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) with the exception of water quality in, and classification of, shellfish growing areas, which were assigned to EC. In 1988, the bioassay portion of the program was incorporated into the responsibilities of DFO to improve closure response times. In February 1990 a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was signed between the Department of the Environment and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans defining the relative roles and responsibilities for the Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) was created in 1996 and the MOU was revised in 2000 to reflect the transfer of Fish Inspection Directorate activities from DFO to the new Agency.

The contemporary legal basis for the CSSP is derived from the Fisheries Act (sections 36 to 42), the Management of Contaminated Fisheries Regulations, the Fish Inspection Act, the Fish Inspection Regulations and the Food and Drugs Act. However, the day-to-day operations of the program are governed by:

  • The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that describes the roles and responsibilities of the three partner departments (CFIA, DFO, EC);
  • A Bilateral Agreement with the United States of America, through which Canadian shellfish exports are provided access to the US marketplace on the condition that a program equivalent to the requirements of the US National Shellfish Sanitation Program (NSSP) is developed and implemented in Canada;
  • Bilateral agreements with other major trading nations (e.g. European Union);
  • A comprehensive Manual of Operations, and other guidance materials, which describes, in detail, the duties and procedures that must be acted upon to deliver the CSSP in a manner that respects the requirements of the bilateral agreement with the USA.

The partner departments face growing challenges and pressures in delivering the CSSP in the 21st century. These include:

  1. Globalization of trade and a corresponding increase in the number of shellfish exporters in Canada;
  2. Ever-increasing sophistication of analytical technologies and procedures, increased scrutiny of Canadian activities by major shellfish trading partners (e.g. EU, USA), and an obligation to keep pace with changing trading requirements in those nations;
  3. Substantial growth in the domestic aquaculture industry over the past two decades;
  4. Expansion of the aquaculture industry into more remote locations and non-traditional or introduced species (e.g. razor clams, Stimpson's surfclams, bay scallops);
  5. Increased shellfish harvesting activities by recreational harvesters and as a traditional food for Aboriginal peoples;
  6. Increases in the areas closed to shellfish harvesting as a result of changing land-based activities;
  7. Improved awareness and new understanding of potential biotoxin hazards;
  8. Increases in recreational boating activities, with associated impacts on water quality trends;
  9. Fiscal restraint within the Government of Canada and limited resources to respond to new demands placed on the program;
  10. Uncertainty within the industry as to their specific responsibilities for aiding in program delivery, and their sources of funding for the costs;
  11. Uncertainties related to the scope of the CSSP.

Program Objectives

The purpose of the CSSP as articulated in the MOU is to provide reasonable assurance that molluscan shellfish are safe for consumption as food, by controlling the harvesting of all molluscs within the tidal waters of Canada.

More specifically, the objectives of the program are to:

  • Continue to protect the public from the consumption of contaminated shellfish (bivalve molluscs more specifically), by controlling the recreational and commercial harvesting of shellfish within Canada, as well as of shellfish imported to Canada;
  • Fulfill Canada's international obligations to meet the terms of bilateral agreements (e.g. Unites States of America, European Union, etc.).

Key Stakeholders

The immediate beneficiaries of the CSSP are the Canadian public, as shellfish consumers, as well as domestic shellfish harvesters and the aquaculture industry, and foreign shellfish consumers. In addition in delivering the program the partner departments must work cooperatively with a growing range of additional, external stakeholders, including:

  • USA, EU and other foreign regulators;
  • The Provinces;
  • Shellfish processors and importers;
  • Commercial shellfish harvesters, dealers and growers.
  • Aboriginal peoples and communities;
  • Recreational harvesters;
  • Other federal departments, including Health Canada.

Resources

Table 1 below provides a summary of annual resources allocated to the CSSP based on data provided by the three departments. There is no centralized cost-tracking system for the CSSP.

Table 1: Summary of CSSP Costs and Expenditures by Department and Region
  Pacific Quebec Atlantic Total
EC 1,089,200 798,000 1,513,000 3,400,200
DFO 697,000 473,000 2,231,000 3,401,000
CFIA 2,110,426 1,369,130 3,833,487 7,313,043
Total Expenses 3,896,626 2,640,130 7,577,487 14,114,243

Expected Outcomes

The ultimate outcomes for the CSSP are:

  • Reasonable assurance that commercially harvested shellfish in Canada are safe for consumption;
  • Reasonable assurance for the safety of recreational and traditional harvest of shellfish;
  • The environmental conditions of shellfish growing areas are properly assessed to provide assurance that shellfish are harvested from safe areas and meet export requirements.

These ultimate outcomes will be achieved by delivering the CSSP in a consistent, co-ordinated and coherent manner with the following immediate outcomes:

CFIA

  • The Fish Inspection Act and the Fish Inspection Regulations are implemented and enforced in a consistent manner across Canadian jurisdiction;
  • Shellfish product processed under the Quality Management Plans are produced under sanitary conditions and meet Canadian and importing country regulatory requirements;
  • Timely recommendations to DFO on the closing and opening of shellfish harvesting areas for marine bio-toxins and other pathogens as applicable;
  • Shellfish product imported into Canada meets Canadian regulatory requirements;
  • Verification that shellfish product are safe and control systems are effective;
  • Access to major international markets (US, EU, Asia);
  • Imported shellfish product meets Canadian safety standards and provide reasonable assurances that shellfish product is fairly traded;
  • Promoting the delivery of the CSSP in a co-ordinated and coherent manner.

DFO

  • The Management of Contaminated Fisheries Regulations are implemented and enforced across Canada;
  • Commercial shellfish harvesting in both open and closed areas is undertaken in a manner consistent with licensing requirements to assure public health and to facilitate export to major international shellfish markets (e.g., USA, EU);
  • Recreational and Aboriginal shellfish harvesters are provided with information on shellfish closures and the risks associated with harvesting in these areas.

EC

  • Based on EC recommendations, waters unfit for shellfish harvesting are closed or controlled under regulatory orders issued by DFO;
  • Waters meeting approved or conditionally approved area criteria are identified for harvesting;
  • Waters used for relay or depuration harvesting are assessed and identified;
  • Confidence in marine water quality bacteriological data on which classification recommendations are based;
  • Sources of pollution impacting shellfish growing areas are identified and controlled by the appropriate level of government and community actions.

The activities that lead to the achievement of these outcomes are described below.

Objectives

A logic model for the CSSP is included in Appendix A.

Accountabilities

The CSSP is managed jointly by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (Fish Inspection Branch), Fisheries and Oceans Canada (Conservation and Protection Branch), and the Environment Canada National Water Quality Monitoring Program (Science and Technology Branch). CFIA is the lead agency for the Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program (CSSP). [Note: CFIA as lead agency was agreed to by ADMs in 2004. The current MOU has not yet been updated to reflect this]. CFIA oversees the overall program coordination and collaborates with international partners.

Program Coordination

National program coordination is achieved through regular meetings of the National Interdepartmental Shellfish Committee (NISC), which is led by CFIA, but includes participation from DFO and EC. The role of the NISC is detailed in the following table:

Interdepartmental Shellfish Committee

  • Review and discuss national shellfish legislation, regulation, policies and procedures
  • Ensure coordination of shellfish activities
  • Report CSSP progress to Sr. Management and produce Annual Report
  • Receive presentations from provinces, industry or others
  • Evaluate and report to stakeholders on new approaches to CSSP
  • Coordination with Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Commission and other international agreements

There are three Regional Interdepartmental Shellfish Committees (RISC) - Pacific, Quebec and Atlantic. The Atlantic RISC (ARISC) also includes four separate Shellfish Working Groups, one for each of the four Atlantic Provinces.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency Responsibilities

The Agency's primary responsibility is to make certain that a comprehensive program for ensuring food safety is in place and operating throughout all of Canada. CFIA is also the lead agency with respect to handling, processing, importing and exporting, and managing the marine biotoxin program. CFIA's role with reference to the CSSP is defined in the Fish Inspection Act, the Fish Inspection Regulations, and the Food and Drugs Act. The Agency's key responsibilities related to these pieces of legislation are defined in the MOU and include:

  • Registration and inspection of shellfish processing and depuration facilities for exporting;
  • Licensing importers and inspecting imported shellfish;
  • Administering the marine biotoxins monitoring program, which include harvest area monitoring;
  • As required, the administering of other harvest area monitoring programs, not covered by EC, such as testing of shellfish for Vp (Vibrio parahaemolyticus) in BC and salmonella for export to the EU.
  • Recommending the closure and openings of harvesting areas to DFO based on the results of the CFIA monitoring programs and maintaining records;
  • Laboratory QA/QC/Certification;
  • International liaising and is the primary contact for external audits on the CSSP.

By way of these responsibilities, the CFIA strives to achieve reasonable assurance that shellfish commercially produced in federally registered facilities and imported into Canada are safe for consumption as food. [CFIA does not inspect facilities that produce for local markets, unless there is an MOU with the province].

Activities

CFIA's CSSP-related activities are captured under two major programs: the Marine Biotoxin Monitoring Program and the Quality Management Program. As the federal agency responsible for the management of the Marine Biotoxin Monitoring Program, CFIA routinely tests shellfish samples for Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP), Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning (ASP), and on a limited basis Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP). CFIA also tests for salmonella for shellfish exported to the EU.

The Agency also plays a prominent role in regulating the processing and preparation of shellfish for the market, including post harvest monitoring and sampling. The Quality Management Program (QMP), an inspection program based on Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) principles, is the main control system used by CFIA to monitor the safety and quality of fish and seafood. The Fish Inspection Regulations require all federally registered fish processing plants in Canada to develop and implement a Quality Management Program (QMP) plan. As described in the Fish Inspection Regulations, all establishments that process fish and seafood for export or inter-provincial trade must be registered with the government of Canada.

The activities carried for the marine biotoxin sampling program and recommended closures for the fiscal year 2004-2005 included12:

Activity Atlantic Quebec Pacific
Biotoxin monitoring at harvest sites 228 sites
4004 samples
75 sites
2543 samples
140 sites
4119 samples
Biotoxin sampling at registered plants 58 samples 758 samples 24 samples
Closures due to presence of high biotoxins 28 recommendations
19 areas closed
3832 days closed
15 recommendations
26 areas closed n/a
41 recommendations

Governance

The Fish, Seafood and Production Division (FSPD) is the division responsible for the overall management and co-ordination of CSSP-related activities at CFIA. The FSPD is part of the Program Branch and consists of a National Capital Region, West and East section. The CFIA branches that are involved in the CSSP are the Program, Operations and Science Branch. Each Branch is headed by a Vice President.

The Program Branch is responsible for developing program policies, reference standards, liaising with other federal government departments and other foreign governments.

The Science Branch focuses on testing lab samples taken as part of the Marine Biotoxin Program and the QMP, conducts laboratory evaluations and carries out limited research-related activities. Sampling activities in the Pacific region are largely conducted by contractors or industry whereas in the Atlantic region, the Agency collects the samples directly.

Inspectors in the Operations Branch conduct compliance verification of registered processing facilities, take the product samples for testing by the Science Branch and take the appropriate enforcement actions. Currently there are approximately 200 inspectors in the Operations Branch that are involved in CSSP activities.

CFIA staff participate in all RISCs and Working Groups, along with representatives from the other federal departments responsible for the CSSP and with provincial governments, industry and First Nations stakeholders.

CSSP sampling is planned annually under the Fish, Seafood and Production Division's National Sampling Plan. The plan's schedule and the resources required for its delivery are negotiated between the Science and Operations organizations and signed off by the appropriate directors.

Department of Fisheries and Oceans Responsibilities

Under CSSP, DFO is responsible for ensuring that bivalve molluscan shellfish are harvested from approved growing areas (i.e., from open areas or closed areas where there is licensed relay or depuration operations). The authorities under which DFO participates in the CSSP flow from the Fisheries Act and the Management of Contaminated Fisheries Regulations.

DFO's key CSSP responsibilities under the Memorandum of Understanding include:

  • Opening and closing shellfish growing areas,
  • Posting patrolling and enforcing shellfish closures in accordance with the Fisheries Act,
  • Controlling shellfish relaying operations and harvesting for depuration operations,
  • Implementing DFO portions of jointly developed Management Plans for "Conditionally Approved" areas,
  • Providing information to stakeholders on opening and closures of shellfish growing areas,
  • Maintaining records of the opening and closure of shellfish growing areas, as well as records of enforcement patrols, and
  • Consult with CFIA and EC prior to the commencement of any developmental or exploratory shellfish fishery or the issuance of any new licences or permits.

Activities

DFO undertakes the following activities as part of CSSP. Under each activity the responsible authority has been specified.

DFO Activity Responsible Authority in DFO
Opening and closing growing areas RDGs approve, with rationale/evidence provided by EC water quality monitoring and/or CFIA biotoxin monitoring
Licensing commercial shellfish harvesters* Fisheries Aquaculture Management (FAM)
Posting, patrolling, and enforcing shellfish closures Conservation and Protection (C&P)
Controlling and licensing relaying and harvesting for depuration Fisheries Aquaculture Management (FAM)
Providing information to stakeholders on growing areas Fisheries Aquaculture Management (FAM)
Record keeping with respect to opening/closure and enforcement All levels feed into FEATS database for patrols;
Regional Office, Fisheries and Aquaculture Management for records of opening and closures.
Consult with CFIA and EC prior to the commencement of any developmental or exploratory shellfish fishery or the issuance of any new licences or permits Fisheries Aquaculture Management (FAM)

* This is indirectly related to the CSSP. The link to licence holders is a key communications tool for advising on classifications.

Governance

CSSP is delivered in DFO through each of the following regions: Pacific, Gulf, Quebec, Maritimes and Newfoundland, with overall management from the National Capital Region. At the national level, CSSP is led by the Director Resource Management. CSSP is not managed separately, but rather as part of the Department's Integrated Fisheries Management Plans. In each Region, the Regional Director Fisheries and Aquaculture Management leads the program, with support from the Resource Management Branch and the Conservation and Protection Branch. There is limited senior management involvement in CSSP in HQ and the Regions, as the program is operationally based and highly decentralized.

DFO staff participates in all RISCs and Working Groups, along with representatives from the other federal departments and agencies governed by the MOU, provincial governments, industry and community stakeholders.

Environment Canada Responsibilities

Environment Canada has two main program responsibilities under the Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program (CSSP), which are implemented by the Department's National Marine Water Quality Monitoring Office. The primary responsibility include undertaking sanitary and water quality surveys in order to make recommendations as to the classification of shellfish growing areas. The secondary responsibility under the CSSP includes the promotion of pollution prevention and remediation of shellfish growing areas.

The specific authorities under which Environment Canada participates in the CSSP flow from the trilateral MOU with CFIA and DFO, and in the CSSP Manual. EC does not have any regulatory responsibilities under the CSSP specific to fisheries management or public health protection. However, EC has administrative responsibility for Section 36-42 of the Fisheries Act, which relates to its role in water pollution control under the General Provision and Regulations under this Act. From this, EC maintains recognized expertise in evaluating pollution sources and assessing pollution control methods and mechanisms. As well, Environment Canada has the mandate to monitor and report on environmental quality (CEPA Part 3 - Information Gathering, Objectives, Guidelines and Codes of practice) - "The Minister shall establish, operate and maintain a system for monitoring environmental quality." And "The Minister shall publish, arrange for the publication of or distribute through an information clearinghouse pertinent information in respect of all aspects of environmental quality".

Environment Canada's key responsibilities under the Memorandum of Understanding include:

  • Conducting comprehensive surveys, annual reviews and re-evaluations of shellfish growing waters
  • Conducting shoreline surveys and determining sources of point and non-point pollution
  • Maintaining records, data bases, sectoral maps, survey reports, central files and other documents in support of classification action and administrative reviews by internal and external auditors
  • Providing QA/QC for laboratories and sampling
  • Promoting pollution prevention, regulatory compliance, remediation and restoration of shellfish growing areas, together with federal / provincial / municipal agencies and other stakeholders.

Activities

Each year, Environment Canada completes classifications for new areas, resurveys existing areas to confirm the appropriateness of approved, closed or conditionally approved, and prohibited classifications and ensures together with CFIA that required evaluations of government/private laboratories conducting CSSP analyses are completed. In Canada, as of April 2006, approximately 15,529 km² of coastal waters were classified for shellfish harvesting, of which 63.5% (9,872 km²) was classified as approved, 3% (460 km²) as conditionally approved and 33.5% (5,197 km²) as closed.

Sampling Activity Atlantic Quebec Pacific
Water quality samples 12,076 samples 5000 samples 4500 samples

In addition, Environment Canada takes measures to promote pollution prevention and encourage the remediation of shellfish growing areas. Frequently, these are undertaken as part of the Department's Ecosystem Initiatives, in collaboration with Provincial Health Officers, in partnership with local and First Nations communities and volunteers, as well as provinces and environmental non-government organizations. These initiatives typically involve capacity building and awareness development of local citizens to promote the remediation of pollution sources and the restoration of shellfish growing areas.

Governance

The National Marine Water Quality Monitoring Office (previously called the Shellfish Water Quality Protection Program), is located in the Science and Technology Branch of Environment Canada. This is one of several water quality monitoring programs within the Science and Technology Branch, but the Office's sole mandate is to deliver on the Department's responsibilities under the MOU of the CSSP.

Environment Canada has Marine Water Quality Monitoring Offices located in each of the three CSSP Regions (Pacific, Quebec and Atlantic), as well as in the National Capital Region. The National Marine Water Quality Monitoring Office is led by a Manager, and each Regional Office is led by a Head who is supported by Area Coordinators and other scientific / technical staff.

Environment Canada staff participate in all RISCs and Working Groups, along with representatives from the other federal departments and agencies governed by the MOU, as well as provincial government representatives. Environment Canada staff present recommend classifications for shellfish growing areas at the RISC meetings, typically held twice each year. In Atlantic, growing area classification survey requests are considered by Provincial Working Groups which include representatives from industry and community stakeholders. Environment Canada considers the survey priority established by the Working Group and attempts to accommodate them in overall survey plans.

While the outputs for EC in each region are the same (i.e. recommendations on the classification of shellfish harvesting areas) based on EC's shoreline sanitary and WQ surveys) the delivery of Environment Canada's program varies slightly between each region. For instance, with regard to the Water Quality Monitoring function, EC in Atlantic tends to use primarily employees and students, as well as agreements with a Provincial government and community groups; Quebec completes the water quality monitoring through contractors only; and Pacific uses contractors, EC employees and volunteers. In contrast, all three regions conduct the shoreline surveys using Environment Canada employees exclusively. With respect to the frequency of water quality monitoring, sampling timelines are variable due to geographic and climate factors.

In Prince Edward Island, there is a unique method of delivering on the CSSP responsibilities. In this province, the Department of Environment, Energy and Forestry collects and analyzes water samples under an equal cost-sharing Agreement with Environment Canada. Furthermore, under this Agreement, all shellfish growing areas in PEI are sampled annually.

Appendix A - Logic Model

Purpose and Objectives

The purpose of the program as articulated in the MOU is to provide reasonable assurance that molluscan shellfish are safe for consumption as food, by controlling the harvesting of all molluscs within the tidal waters of Canada.

More specifically, the objectives of the program are to:

  • Protect the public from the consumption of contaminated shellfish (bivalve molluscs more specifically), by controlling the recreational and commercial harvesting of shellfish within Canada, as well as of shellfish imported to Canada;
  • Fulfill Canada's international obligations under Bilateral Agreements with major trading partners, such as the United States of America and European Union.

Activities

Canadian Food Inspection Agency:

  1. The administration and enforcement of the Fish Inspection Act and the Fish Inspection Regulations, as it relates to the CSSP.
  2. Registration of shellfish processing and depuration facilities (export only).
  3. Harvest area monitoring for marine bio-toxins and non sewage micro-biological pathogens.
  4. Licensing of importers.
  5. Laboratory QA and analysis of shellfish product.
  6. International contact lead.
  7. Lead for the CSSP (2004 ADM decision).

DFO Conservation and Protection Branch and Resource Management Branch:

  1. Opening and closing shellfish areas, on advice from EC and CFIA.
  2. Licensing commercial shellfish harvesters*.
    * (This is indirectly related to the CSSP. The link to licence holders is a key communications tool for advising on classifications.)
  3. Posting, patrolling, and enforcing shellfish closures.
  4. Licensing and controlling relaying and harvesting for depuration operations.
  5. Providing information to stakeholders on shellfish growing areas.
  6. Record keeping with respect to opening/closures and enforcement.

EC Marine Water Quality Monitoring program Science & Technology Branch (formerly the Shellfish Water Quality Protection Program):

  1. Conducting comprehensive and re-evaluation marine water quality sampling surveys for fecal coliform, and annual reviews of shellfish growing waters.
  2. Conducting shoreline surveys to determine actual and potential sources of point and non-point pollution impacting shellfish areas.
  3. Maintaining records, maps and data bases for survey results and reports.
  4. Marine water quality sampling and laboratory QA/QC.
  5. Promoting pollution prevention (secondary role) through cooperative work with provinces, municipalities and others (First Nations, community groups) to protect and encourage the remediation of shellfish growing waters from land and water-based sources of pollution.

Outputs

Canadian Food Inspection Agency:

  1. Policy clarifications / amendments, procedural changes, data analysis, program audits, enforcement activities, communiqués (internal and external).
  2. Issuing of annual facility and depuration facility registration certificates.
  3. Compliance verifications to verify processors and depurators are implementing their Quality Management Program (QMP) plan.
  4. Issuing of product export certificates.
  5. Marine bio-toxin and non-sewage micro-biological monitoring samples (as applicable) are taken and analysed.
  6. Recommendations for closing / opening of harvesting areas for marine bio-toxins and other pathogens are provided to DFO.
  7. Issuing of annual import licenses and auditing of import license requirements Inspection of Imported shellfish product.
  8. The annual national sampling plan product samples are taken and tested.
  9. Input at Codex in the establishment of international shellfish standards.

    Negotiating, establishing and maintaining international shellfish agreements for the trade of fresh and live shellfish and resolving issues.

    Maintaining the listing of Canadian facilities on the US Interstate Certified Shellfish Shippers List.

  10. Chairing the National ISC and Regional ISCs; Co-ordinating internal and external audits.

DFO Conservation and Protection Branch and Resource Management Branch:

  1. Contaminated areas are closed to shellfish harvesting, unless licensed relay or depuration operations are in place.
  2. Commercial shellfish harvesting licenses are issued.
  3. Depuration and relay licenses are issued.
  4. Records related to opening and closure of shellfish growing areas are maintained.
  5. Annual patrol enforcement activity reports are prepared.

EC Marine Water Quality Monitoring program Science & Technology Branch (formerly the Shellfish Water Quality Protection Program):

  1. Survey results and appropriate area classification recommendations on growing area classification are presented to RISCs for decision.
  2. Recommendations on emergency closures (sanitary, chemical) are made to DFO as required.
  3. Water sampling activities and laboratory analyses for fecal coliform.
  4. Conform with QA/QC standards.
  5. Advise regulatory authorities to encourage facility owners to comply with operating permits and best practices for sources that impact growing areas.
  6. Influence communities and First Nations to encourage good land use practices adjacent to shellfish waters.
  7. Provide advice on environmental assessments of projects with impacts on shellfish growing waters.

Immediate Outcomes

Canadian Food Inspection Agency:

  1. The Fish Inspection Act and the Fish Inspection Regulations are implemented and enforced in a consistent manner across Canadian jurisdiction.
  2. Shellfish product processed under the QMP are produced under sanitary conditions and meet Canadian and importing country regulatory requirements.
  3. Timely recommendations to DFO on the closing and opening of shellfish harvesting areas for marine bio-toxins and other pathogens as applicable.
  4. Shellfish product imported into Canada meets Canadian regulatory requirements. (Live / raw shellfish product is originating from a country Canada has an agreement with).
  5. Verification that shellfish product are safe and control systems are effective.
  6. Access to major international markets (US, EU, Asia); imported shellfish product meets Canadian safety standards and provide reasonable assurances that shellfish product is fairly traded.
  7. Promoting the delivery of the CSSP in a co-ordinated and coherent manner.

DFO Conservation and Protection Branch and Resource Management Branch:

  1. The Fisheries Act (sections 36 to 42), and the Management of Contaminated Fisheries Regulations are implemented and enforced across Canada.
  2. Commercial shellfish harvesting in both open and closed areas is undertaken in a manner consistent with licensing requirements to assure public health and to facilitate export to major international shellfish markets (e.g., USA, EU).
  3. Recreational and Aboriginal shellfish harvesters are provided with information on shellfish closures and the risks associated with harvesting in these areas.

EC Marine Water Quality Monitoring program Science & Technology Branch (formerly the Shellfish Water Quality Protection Program):

  1. Waters unfit for shellfish harvesting are closed or controlled under regulatory orders issued by DFO.
  2. Waters meeting approved area criteria are identified for harvesting.
  3. Confidence in data on which classification recommendations are based.
  4. Sources of pollution impacting shellfish growing areas are identified and controlled.

Ultimate Outcomes

  • Reasonable assurance that commercially harvested shellfish in Canada are safe for consumption.
  • The safety of recreational and traditional harvesters of shellfish are reasonably assured.
  • The environmental conditions of shellfish growing areas are properly assessed to provide assurance that shellfish are harvested from safe areas and meet export requirements.

12 Information obtained from the CSSP Annual Report 2004-2005

13 A full list of activities/services that are bound by federal regulatory requirements can be found in the Alternatives Analysis Workshop report.

14 A full list of activities/services that are bound by federal regulatory requirements can be found in the Alternatives Analysis Workshop report.

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