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Chapter 5
Nutrition Labelling
Sections 5.9-5.18

5.9 Format Hierarchy Summary

Format Hierarchy Summary

Step 1
Measure the available display surface of your package (if less than 100 cm2, see 5.10).

Step 2
Choose a Nutrition Facts table format, e.g., Standard, Simplified, Dual (Foods Requiring Preparation), Aggregate (Different Kinds of Foods), Dual or Aggregate (Different Amounts of Food)

Step 3
Select a variation of the format chosen in Step 2: separate English and French tables; a single bilingual table; or the narrow form of separate English and French tables (Standard Format only).

Step 4
Determine which information must be included within the table (core plus additional).

Step 5
Determine whether the available display surface of your package is large enough to accommodate the largest size version of the format variation (selected in Step 3).

Step 6
Consider the orientation and location of the selected size version of the format variation (from Step 5) . Once a version fits, it is determined to be the minimum size permitted for the Nutrition Facts table. If it does not fit, continue to Step 7 or 8 as applicable.

Step 7
Determine whether the bilingual horizontal format is applicable.

Step 8
Determine other options: a format version that occupies more than 15% of the available display surface; a format with reduced leading; the linear or simplified linear format; a shortened version of the statement required in the simplified format; or any of "alternative methods of presentation" (a tag attached to the package, a package insert, the inner side of a label, a fold-out label, and an outer sleeve, overwrap or collar).

5.10  Small Packages

Products with an available display surface of less than 100 cm2 are considered to be "small packages" and do not have to carry a Nutrition Facts table if the outer side of the label of the product indicates to consumers how they may obtain the nutrition information that would otherwise be required in a Nutrition Facts table on the label [B.01.467(1)].

The indication on the label of the "small package" that tells consumers how to get the nutrition information must

  • be set out in a type size of at least 8 points [B.01.467(3)(a)],
  • include a postal address or a toll-free telephone number [B.01.467(3)(b)], and
  • be in English and French, unless otherwise exempt from the bilingual labelling requirements (see 5.5.5) [B.01.467(3)(c)].

The nutrition information provided to consumers must

  • be provided without charge [B.01.467(4)(a)],
  • be in English and/or French, as requested by the consumer, (unless the information is otherwise exempt from the bilingual labelling requirements (see 5.5.5 of this Guide) [B.01.467(4)(b)], and
  • be in the form of a Nutrition Facts table in a format, other than a horizontal format, that would otherwise be carried on the label of the product [as specified in B.01.454 to B.01.459]. The minimum size required for the Nutrition Facts table is the largest version, (i.e., in a version that is listed in column 1 of item 1 of any Part of tables B.01.454 to B.01.459), according to the following Figures in Schedule L, FDR:
    • 1.1(E) and (F) - Standard Format;
    • 2.1(E) and (F) - Narrow Standard Format;
    • 3.1(B) - Bilingual Standard Format;
    • 5.1(E) and (F) - Simplified Standard Format;
    • 6.1(B) - Bilingual Simplified Standard Format;
    • 8.1(E) and (F) - Dual Format - Foods Requiring Preparation;
    • 9.1(B) - Bilingual Dual Format - Foods Requiring Preparation;
    • 10.1(E) and (F) - Aggregate Format - Different Kinds of Foods;
    • 11.1(B) - Bilingual Aggregate Format - Different Kinds of Foods;
    • 12.1(E) and (F) - Dual Format - Different Amounts of Food;
    • 13.1(B) - Bilingual Dual Format - Different Amounts of Food;
    • 14.1(E) and (F) - Aggregate Format - Different Amounts of Food;, or
    • 15.1(B) - Bilingual Aggregate Format - Different Amounts of Food.

Products in small packages must carry a Nutrition Facts table when :

  1. the product contains an added vitamin, or mineral nutrient [B.01.401(3)(a)];
  2. a vitamin or mineral nutrient is declared as a component of one of the ingredients (other than flour) [B.01.401(3)(b)];
  3. the product contains aspartame, sucralose or acesulfame potassium [B.01.401(3)(c)];
  4. the label or advertisement refers to the energy value, core nutrients [table to B.01.401],  additional nutrients [table to B.01.402], or their constituents (except for a common name used in the ingredient list, and for information required by Division 12, FDR, on prepackaged water and ice) [B.01.401(3)(e)(i)];
  5. the label or advertisement contains a representation that expressly or implicitly indicates that the food has particular nutritional or health-related properties, including nutrient content claims [table following B.01.513], health claims [table following B.01.603], biological role claims [B.01.311(3) to (5)], vitamin claims [D.01.006], and mineral claims [D.02.004] [B.01.401(3)(e)(ii)];
  6. the label or advertisement contains a health-related name, statement, logo, symbol, seal of approval or mark [B.01.401(3)(e)(iii)]; or
  7. the label or advertisement contains the phrase "nutrition facts", "valeur nutritive" or "valeurs nutritives" [B.01.401(3)(e)(iv)].

Note that "bigger" packages are never eligible to use a toll-free number to provide the Nutrition Facts table. This is the case even when their available display surface is calculated to be less than 100 cm2 by virtue of the fact that a label could not be physically applied to them or information could not be legibly set out and easily viewed by the purchaser (see "available display surface" in 5.5.2 of this Guide and B.01.467(2)(b)). As a minimum, manufacturers with "smaller" packages (note: not to be confused with "small packages" as described in 5.9 of this Guide above) must explore the use of any of the other format options described in Step 8 of 5.8 of this Guide.

There are no Figures in Schedule L, FDR, specifically relating to "small packages". When a Nutrition Facts table must be provided with the product, determine the format, variation and size version to use for the Nutrition Facts table (see 5.8 of this Guide: Step-by-Step Guide to Using the Formats). In most cases, the other format options will apply, including the specific "alternative methods of presentation" listed in B.01.466(1). These are: a tag attached to the package (see 5.11 of this Guide), a package insert, the inner side of a label, a fold-out label, an outer sleeve, an overwrap or a collar.

5.11 Tags

The Nutrition Facts table may alternatively be presented on a tag attached to a package (see 5.8 of this Guide: Step 8, Other Option 5, Alternative Methods of Presentation above), in the following situations:

  • when none of the versions of the Nutrition Facts table fits within 15% of the available display surface;
  • when none of the versions of the Nutrition Facts table will fit on a continuous surface (see Steps 1 to 7 of section 5.8 of this Guide), (i.e., when a label cannot be physically applied or on which information cannot be legibly set out and easily viewed by the purchaser or consumer under the customary conditions of purchase);, or
  • when the container is ornamental (see 5.12 of this Guide)

The "available display surface" of a tag is defined in 5.5.1 of this Guide.

A toll-free telephone number is not an acceptable method of presenting a Nutrition facts table on a tag. When the Nutrition Facts table is set out on a tag, it must be set out in a format and size described in one of the following Regulations:

  1. B.01.454(6) Standard and Horizontal Formats;
  2. B.01.455(5) Simplified Formats;
  3. B.01.456(4) Dual Format – Foods Requiring Preparation;
  4. B.01.457(4) Aggregate Format – Different Kinds of Foods;
  5. B.01.458(4) Dual Format – Different Amounts of Food;, or
  6. B.01.459(4) Aggregate Format – Different Amounts of Food.

Some examples of foods which might be labelled with a tag include whole frozen turkeys, waxed-encased small cheeses in a mesh bag; and foil-wrapped milk chocolate Easter eggs in a mesh bags.

5.12 Ornamental Containers

An "ornamental container" means a container that, except on the bottom, does not have any promotional or advertising material thereon, other than a trade mark or common name and that, because of any design appearing on its surface or because of its shape or texture, appears to be a decorative ornament and is sold as a decorative ornament in addition to being sold as the container of the product [B.01.001].

The "available display surface" of an ornamental container is explained in 5.5.1 of this Guide.

A distinction must be made between an ornamental container and a decorative container. Ornamental containers have the potential for an extended life as they are reusable. Decorative containers, although aesthetically pleasing, are usually not reusable because they are not sturdy enough and often get torn or damaged upon opening. Ornamental containers must be substantial enough to be sold on their own merit (i.e., without the food). Ornamental containers are usually made of metal (e.g., cookie tins), plastic or glass (e.g., candy filled figurines). On the other hand, fabric-covered or embossed cardboard boxes for chocolates (e.g., for Valentines Day) are normally considered decorative rather than ornamental.

5.13  Foods Sold Only in the Retail Establishment Where Packaged

As previously mentioned in 5.3.2 of this Guide, many products sold only in the retail establishment where they are packaged, are exempt from carrying a Nutrition Facts table, unless they lose their exempt status under specific circumstances [B.01.401(2) and (3)].

Examples of foods sold only in the retail establishment where they are packaged, and that could be exempt from carrying a Nutrition Facts table, include:

  1. a prepackaged food that is labelled by means of a sticker and which has an available display surface of less than 200 cm2 (e.g., a small wedge of Swiss cheese, a slice of pâté, a chunk of salami, several slices of ham, etc. that are prepackaged and sold from the deli counter [B.01.401(2)(b)(viii)]);
  2. prepackaged fresh vegetables and fruits or any combination of fresh vegetables and fruits without any added ingredients (including cut up fruit/vegetables), oranges with colour and fresh vegetables or fruits coated with paraffin wax or petrolatum [B.01.401(2)(b)(ii)];
  3. prepackaged raw single ingredient meat, meat by-product, poultry meat, and poultry meat by-product (e.g., packages found at the "meat counter" in the grocery store, including those that are frozen or have been previously frozen, [B.01.401(2)(b)(iii)]).Ground products in this category are not part of the exemption. For these ground products, a Nutrition Facts table is always required [B.01.401(3)(d)];
  4. prepackaged raw single ingredient marine and freshwater animal products (e.g., fish, molluscs and crustaceans at the "fish counter"), including those that are frozen or have been previously frozen) [B.01.401(2)(b)(iv)];
  5. prepackaged foods sold only in the retail establishment where the product is prepared and processed. This includes foods made from pre-mixes (e.g., breads, muffins from the in-store bakery, etc.). However, in cases where only water is added to the pre-mix, a Nutrition Facts table is required [B.01.401(2)(b)(v)];, and
  6. prepackaged individual servings sold for immediate consumption (i.e.,sandwiches and ready-made salads), which have not been subjected to a process to extend their durable life (includes the use of special packaging) [B.01.401(2)(b)(vii)].

In addition, non-prepackaged foods sold in a retail establishment are exempt from carrying a Nutrition Facts table (e.g., cheeses in the deli counter (clerk-served), bulk displays of fruits and vegetables (self-serve), etc.), unless there is a nutrient representation made with respect to the food. If there is such a representation, the label or advertisement is required to declare the amount of the nutrient that is the subject of the representation, on a per serving of stated size basis [B.01.312, B.01.503(1)(c), table following B.01.603].

Exempt foods may voluntarily display the Nutrition Facts table. If they do so, the information in the Nutrition Facts table must meet all requirements [B.01.401(1) & B.01.402(2)]. The table must be presented in the format that would have been required had the food not been exempt [B.01.450 to B.01.455].

5.13.1  Other Foods Sold in a Retail Establishment

Except for the situations mentioned in 5.13 of this Guide, most foods sold in a retail establishment are required to carrying a Nutrition Facts table. Some examples of foods requiring a Nutrition Facts table include:

  • foods prepared at a location other than a retail establishment where they are sold and which are subsequently packaged in preprinted containers (e.g., preprinted plastic bread bags, any size bulk salad containers, package for single muffin, etc.), in the retail establishment where they are sold;
  • foods prepared at a location other than the retail establishment where they are sold and have an available display surface of 200 cm2 or more and are labelled with a sticker (e.g., bag of buns, salads in containers greater than 250 ml, etc.);
  • foods prepared from pre-mixes within the retail establishment where they are sold, from pre-mixes (e.g., breads, muffins, etc.) when water is the only ingredient added to the pre-mix;, and
  • exempted foods (e.g., fresh fruits, single ingredient meat, marine product, etc.) which lose the exemption under the specific circumstances discussed in 5.3.3 of this Guide [B.01.401(3)] .

For foods sold only in the retail establishment where they are packaged, for which the available display surface of the container is 200 cm2 or more and when labelled with a sticker, the Nutrition Facts table must appear in one of the following format versions (without regard for the 15% ceiling) [B.01.454(5)]:

  • 1.1 to 1.3 (E) and (F) - Standard;
  • 2.1 to 2.3 (E) and (F) - Narrow Standard;, or
  • 3.1 to 3.3 (B) - Bilingual Standard.

or, if the food is eligible to use a Simplified Format (see 5.6.2 of this Guide), the following format versions may be used [B.01.455(4)]:

  • 5.1 to 5.3 (E) and (F) - Simplified Standard;, or
  • 6.1 to 6.3 (B) - Bilingual Simplified Standard

in all other situations, the appropriate Nutrition Facts table format, including variation and size version must be chosen from the format hierarchies (see 5.8, Table 5-2 of this Guide).

5.14  Foods for Commercial or Industrial Enterprises or Institutions

Multi-serving, ready-to-serve products (such as lasagna or shepherd's pie) that are intended to be served solely in a commercial or industrial enterprise or institution (such as a restaurant, cafeteria or hospital) must provide all the information required by B.01.401 and B.01.402. While this information does not have to be attached to the product (although it could be!), it must accompany each and every delivery (e.g., on a specification sheet, a work sheet, a bill, a label, etc). It is not sufficient to have the information simply "on file" [B.01.405 (2)].

The information does not have to appear in a Nutrition Facts table format as prescribed by B.01.401(1) [B.01.401(7)(b)]. However, it must adhere to the rules prescribing the order of listing, rounding of values, expression of nutrients per serving and as % Daily Value, etc. [B.01.405(3)].

5.15  Foods for Use in Manufacturing Other Foods

Prepackaged products that are intended solely for use as ingredients in the manufacture of other foods or as ingredients in the preparation of food by a commercial or industrial enterprise or institution, must be accompanied by written nutrition information when delivered to the purchaser. However, the nutritional information does not have to be attached to the product (although it could be!). The information must accompany each and every delivery (e.g., on a specification sheet, a work sheet, a bill, a label, etc.) It is not sufficient to have the information simply "on file" [B.01.401(7), B.01.404].

The accompanying information must include information that would have been required or permitted by B.01.401 and B.01.402 to be included in a Nutrition Facts table (except that no table format is specified).

The accompanying information may include other information that is permitted by B.01.402.

The information must be expressed in accordance with B.01.401 and B.01.402, except that it must be provided in absolute amounts, expressed as applicable:

  • per gram or per 100 grams of the food, if the net quantity of the food is declared on the label by weight or by count [B.01.404(3)(c)(i)(A) and (ii)(A)]
  • per millilitre or per 100 millilitre if the net quantity of the food is declared on the label by volume [B.01.404(3)(c)(i)(B) and (ii)(B)]
  • in milligrams, micrograms, retinol equivalents, or niacin equivalents, as applicable, for vitamins and mineral nutrients [Table I to Division 1 of Part D and Table I to Division 2 of Part D] [B.01.404(3)(c)(i)]
  • in the units set out in column 3 of the tables to B.01.401 and B.01.402, as applicable, for other nutrients (grams, milligrams, as applicable) and
  • in Calories, (kilojoules being optional) for the energy value [B.01.404(3)(c)(ii)]

Percentages of daily values and information on "serving of stated size" may be omitted [B.01.404(3)(c)(iii)].

All information must be stated with a degree of precision (i.e., same number of significant figures) corresponding to the accuracy of the analytical methodology used to produce the nutrition information. Since the nutrient information provided to the manufacturer may be used to create a Nutrition Facts table for another food, it must not be rounded [B.01.404(3)(c)(iv)].

The nutrition labelling requirements for "Foods for Use in Manufacturing Other Foods" are found in section B.01.404 of the Food and Drug Regulations. Note that the nutrition labelling exemptions found in B.01.401 do not apply. This means that, for example, while prepackaged fresh apples sold in a retail store are exempt from carrying a Nutrition Facts table [B.01.401(2)(b)(ii)] (unless they lose the exemption - see 5.3.1 of this Guide), prepackaged apples intended solely as

  • an ingredient for use in the manufacture of other prepackaged consumer foods (e.g., apple sauce), or
  • an ingredient (e.g., sliced apples) for use in the preparation of food (e.g., an apple pie) by a commercial or industrial enterprise or institution

must be accompanied by written nutrition information upon delivery (see information at beginning of this section).

It is important to distinguish between foods used that are intended solely for use in the manufacturing of other foods and those which, while used in the manufacturing of other foods may also be used for other purposes. For example, a food is not considered to be "solely for use in the manufacturing of other foods" when shipping containers of bulk products (e.g., powdered chicken soup base, semi-sweet chocolate chips, flour, etc.), are sold to commercial or industrial enterprises or institutions and to retail establishments where these containers are either repackaged from bulk on those retail premises or sold unpackaged directly to consumers from bulk bins. These shipping containers require a Nutrition Facts table in the prescribed format.

5.16  Foods Intended Solely for Children Under Two Years of Age

Unless otherwise exempted (see 5.3 for exemptions), prepackaged foods intended solely for children under two years of age are required to carry a Nutrition Facts table. This section of the Guide is not complete on its own. It should be used in conjunction with the rest of the Guide and with the specific nutrition labelling regulations pertaining to foods intended solely for children under two years of age found in the Food and Drug Regulations.

5.16.1  Information in the Nutrition Facts Table

In the case of foods for children under two years of age, the Nutrition Facts table, includes: the title "Nutrition Facts"; the serving of stated size; the number of Calories; the amounts of fat, sodium, carbohydrate, fibre, sugars, and protein; and the percent Daily Value of vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium and iron.

Standard Format - Children Under Two Years of Age

Image - Nutrition Facts Table for Foods Intended Solely for Children Under Two (English)
Figure 20.1(E)
Image - Nutrition Facts Table for Foods Intended Solely for Children Under Two (French)
Figure 20.1(F)

For purposes of illustration only. Copying may cause distortion.

Unlike other prepackaged foods, the Nutrition Facts table for a food intended for a child under two years of age may NOT include[B.01.403]:

  • the percentage of the reference standard (% Daily Value) for fat, cholesterol, sodium, potassium, carbohydrate, fibre, and for the sum of saturated and trans fatty acids
  • the energy value from fat nor from the sum of saturated and trans fatty acids;, and
  • any of the footnotes to the subheading "% Daily Value" such as: "Based on a 2,000 Calorie diet" or "Percentage Daily Values are based on a 2,000 Calorie diet"

The amount of saturated fatty acids, trans fatty acids, and cholesterol may be omitted from the Nutrition Facts table for foods for children under two. However, when cholesterol is declared, the amount of saturated fatty acids and trans fatty acids must also be declared.

Additional information may be shown in the Nutrition Facts tables, for children under two. When shown, this additional information must be presented as illustrated in Schedule L, Figures 33.1(E) and (F) or Figure 34.1(B) with respect to the order of presentation, indentation and the presentation of footnotes. The information must be incorporated into an applicable format (e.g., standard, narrow standard, bilingual standard, etc.) as selected according to the information presented in this chapter. The additional information must be shown in both English and French, except as provided for in subsections B.01.012(3) or (7) dealing with local & specialty foods, when it may be shown in only English or only French [B.01.402(9)].

NOTE: Figures 33.1(E)&(F) and 34.1(B) are not format choices.

5.16.2  Formats for the Nutrition Facts Table [from the Figures described in Schedule L, FDR]

For foods for children under two, three basic Nutrition Facts table formats [B.01.461] are available: standard, horizontal, and linear. There are also some specialized Nutrition Facts formats: Simplified Formats [B.01.462]; Aggregate Format – Different Kinds of Foods [B.01.463]; and Aggregate Format – Different Amounts of Food [B.01.464].

There is no dual format for foods for children under two. The Nutrition Facts table formats for foods for children under two are listed in Table 5-3 below along with their corresponding Figure number from Schedule L, FDR. (See Schedule L, FDR, for the graphics for the formats [Figures 20.1(E) to 32.2(F)]).

Table 5-3
Figures for Nutrition Facts Tables for Children Under Two (CU2)

The following table is a summarized list of the figures in Schedule L, FDR, that apply to foods solely for children under two years of age.

Standard CU2

  • 20.1(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.461] 
  • 20.2(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.461]
  • 20.3(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.461]
  • 20.4(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.461]
  • 20.5(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.461]
  • 20.6(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.461]

Narrow Standard CU2

  • 21.1(E)&(F) - [Table Part 2 to B.01.461]  
  • 21.2(E)&(F) - [Table Part 2 to B.01.461]
  • 21.3(E)&(F) - [Table Part 2 to B.01.461]
  • 21.4(E)&(F) - [Table Part 2 to B.01.461]

Bilingual Standard CU2

  • 22.1(B) - [Table Part 3 to B.01.461]
  • 22.2(B) - [Table Part 3 to B.01.461]
  • 22.3(B) - [Table Part 3 to B.01.461]
  • 22.4(B) - [Table Part 3 to B.01.461]
  • 22.5(B) - [B.01.461(3)(a)]
  • 22.6(B) - [B.01.461(3)(a)]
  • 22.7(B) - [B.01.461(3)(a)]

Bilingual Horizontal CU2

  • 23.1(B) - [Table Part 4 to B.01.461]
  • 23.2(B) - [Table Part 4 to B.01.461]
  • 23.3(B) - [B.01.461(3)(b)]
  • 23.4(B) - [B.01.461(3)(b)]
  • 23.5(B) - [B.01.461(3)(b)]

Simplified Standard CU2

  • 24.1(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.462]
  • 24.2(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.462]
  • 24.3(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.462]
  • 24.4(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.462]
  • 24.5(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.462]
  • 24.6(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.462]

Bilingual Simplified Standard CU2

  • 25.1(B) - [Table Part 2 to B.01.462]
  • 25.2(B) - [Table Part 2 to B.01.462]
  • 25.3(B) - [Table Part 2 to B.01.462]
  • 25.4(B) - [Table Part 2 to B.01.462]
  • 25.5(B) - [B.01.462(3)(a)]
  • 25.6(B) - [B.01.462(3)(a)]

Bilingual Simplified Horizontal CU2

  • 26.1(B) - [Table Part 3 to B.01.461]
  • 26.2(B) - [Table Part 3 to B.01.461]
  • 26.3(B) - [B.01.461(3)(b)]
  • 26.4(B) - [B.01.461(3)(b)]

Dual Foods Requiring Preparation CU2

  • 27.1(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.463]
  • 27.2(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.463]
  • 27.3(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.463]
  • 27.4(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.463]
  • 27.5(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.463]
  • 27.6(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.463]

Bilingual Aggregate Different Kinds of Foods CU2

  • 28.1(B) - [Table Part 2 to B.01.463]
  • 28.2(B) - [Table Part 2 to B.01.463]
  • 28.3(B) - [Table Part 2 to B.01.463]
  • 28.4(B) - [Table Part 2 to B.01.463]
  • 28.5(B) - [B.01.463(2)(a)]
  • 28.6 (B) - [B.01.463(2)(a)]

Aggregate Different Kinds of Foods CU2

  • 29.1(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.464]  
  • 29.2(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.464]  
  • 29.3(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.464]  
  • 29.4(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.464]  
  • 29.5(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.464]  
  • 29.6(E)&(F) - [Table Part 1 to B.01.464]  

Bilingual Aggregate Different Kinds of Foods CU2

  • 30.1(B) - [Table Part 2 to B.01.464]
  • 30.2(B) - [Table Part 2 to B.01.464]
  • 30.3(B) - [Table Part 2 to B.01.464]
  • 30.4(B) - [Table Part 2 to B.01.464]
  • 30.5(B) - [B.01.464(2)(a)(i) & (b)(i)]
  • 30.6(B) - [B.01.464(2)(a)(i) & (b)(i)]

Linear CU2

  • 31.1(E)&(F) - [B.01.461(3)(c)]
  • 31.2(E)&(F) - [B.01.461(3)(c)]

Simplified Linear CU2

  • 32.1(E)&(F) - [B.01.462(3)(c)]
  • 32.2(E)&(F) - [B.01.462(3)(c)]

Presentation of Additional Information CU2

  • 33.1(E)&(F) - [B.01.465(1)(a)]

Bilingual Presentation of Additional Information CU2

  • 34.1(B) - [B.01.465(3)(a)]

5.16.3  The Simplified Format

If 6 or more of the energy value and nutrients of fat, sodium, carbohydrate, fibre, sugars, protein, and vitamins A and C, calcium and iron may be expressed as "0" in the table, a simplified version may be used [B.01.403(5)].

The simplified format for foods for children under two must include the following information:

  1. the serving of stated size, the energy value and the amounts of fat, carbohydrate and protein;
  2. any nutrient which is the subject of a nutritional or health-related claim or representation as described in section 5.16.7 and 5.16.8 of this Guide;
  3. the amount of any sugar alcohol, vitamin and mineral nutrient added to the food, except fluoride added to prepacked water or ice;
  4. the amount of sodium, fibre, sugars, vitamins A and C, iron, and calcium when these cannot be declared as "0";
  5. all vitamins and mineral nutrients declared as a component of one of the product's ingredients (except if the ingredient is flour).;, and
  6. the statement "Not a significant source of (naming all the nutrients listed in 5.15.1 of this Guide that have been omitted from the Nutrition Facts table)". Saturated fatty acids, trans fatty acids, and cholesterol are not required to be listed in this statement as their declaration is only triggered when the amount of cholesterol is provided.

The formats for the simplified version include [table to B.01.462]:

  • the simplified standard format (Figures 24.1 to 24.6, Schedule L, FDR);
  • the bilingual simplified (Figures 25.1 to 25.4);
  • the bilingual simplified horizontal format (Figures 26.1 and 26.2).

When the formats listed will not fit within 15% of the available display surface, alternative formats are provided in B.01.462(3).

5.16.4 Aggregate Format - Foods Packaged Together and Different Amounts of Food for Food

There are two types of aggregate formats, one for different kinds of foods packaged together and one for different amounts of food. B.01.463 and B.01.464 provide the format options and alternatives for the Aggregate Formats.

The Aggregate Format for different kinds of foods packaged together must be used to label foods intended solely for children under two years of age when the information in the Nutrition Facts table is given for more than one food. This would occur:

  • when the prepackaged product contains separately packaged ingredients or foods that are intended to be consumed together, and it is decided to set out the information for each food, not the entire food [B.01.406(2)];
  • when a prepackaged product contains an assortment of foods with different nutrient values, with each food representing a discrete serving [B.01.406(3)(a)];, and
  • when the prepackaged product contains an assortment of foods (a typical serving would be a mixture of the foods), and the information is set out for each food rather than for the entire food [B.01.406(4)].

The Aggregate Format for different amounts of food is used to reflect Nutrition Facts for different units of measurement when the amount of food consumed may vary (e.g., number of cookies) [B.01.406(8)].

5.16.5 Step-by-Step Guide to Using the Formats

Except as otherwise noted, the Step-by-Step Guide to Using Formats, in 5.8 of this Guide, is similar for foods intended solely for children under two years of age, except that the Figures from Schedule L, FDR, that are used in the examples in 5.8 of this Guide do not apply to foods for children under two.

In Step 4, in the discussion about "additional information", substitute Figures 33.1(E) and (F) and 34.1(B) of Schedule L when using the step-by-step guide for labels of foods intended solely for children under two. In Step 5, refer to the hierarchies of formats (e.g. figures from Schedule L, FDR) set out below in Table 5-4

Table 5-4 Format Hierarchies for Foods for Children under Two (CU2)

Bilingual Standard CU2
[Table Part 3 to B.01.461]

22.1(B)
down arrow
22.2(B)
down arrow
22.3(B)
down arrow
22.4(B)

Standard CU2
[Table Part 1 to B.01.461]

20.1(E)&(F)
down arrow
20.2(E)&(F)
down arrow
20.3(E)&(F)
down arrow
20.4(E)&(F)
down arrow
20.5(E)&(F)
down arrow
20.6(E)&(F)

Narrow Standard CU2
[Table Part 2 to B.01.461]

21.1(E)&(F)
down arrow
21.2(E)&(F)
down arrow
21.3(E)&(F)
down arrow
21.4(E)&(F)

Bilingual Simplified Standard CU2
[Table Part 2 to B.01.462]

25.1(B)
down arrow
25.2(B)
down arrow
25.3(B)
down arrow
25.4(B)

Simplified Standard CU2
[Table Part 1 to B.01.462]

24.1(E)&(F)
down arrow
24.2(E)&(F)
down arrow
24.3(E)&(F)
down arrow
24.4(E)&(F)
down arrow
24.5(E)&(F)
down arrow
24.6(E)&(F)

Aggregate - Different Amounts CU2
[Table Part 1 to B.01.464]

29.1(E)&(F)
down arrow
29.2(E)&(F)
down arrow
29.3(E)&(F)
down arrow
29.4(E)&(F)
down arrow
29.5(E)&(F)
down arrow
29.6(E)&(F)

Bilingual Aggregate - Different Kinds CU2
[Table Part 2 to B.01.463]

28.1(B)
down arrow
28.2(B)
down arrow
28.3(B)
down arrow
28.4(B)

Aggregate - Different Kinds CU2
[Table Part 1 to B.01.463]

27.1(E)&(F)
down arrow
27.2(E)&(F)
down arrow
27.3(E)&(F)
down arrow
27.4(E)&(F)
down arrow
27.5(E)&(F)
down arrow
27.6(E)&(F)

Bilingual Aggregate - Different Amounts CU2
[Table Part 2 to B.01.464]

30.1(B)
down arrow
30.2(B)
down arrow
30.3(B)
down arrow
30.4(B)

In Step 7, the use of the horizontal format and the simplified horizontal format is only permitted when none of the versions of the standard format (or simplified format) identified in Step 5 (Parts 1 to 3 of Table to B.01.461 or Parts 1 and 2 of Table to B.01.462) will fit on the label.

In Step 8, Other Option 2, the formats with reduced leading are

  • the bilingual standard format [B.01.461(3)(a), Figures 22.5(B) to 22.7(B)];
  • the bilingual horizontal format [B.01.461(3)(b), Figures 23.3(B) or 23.4(B)];
  • the bilingual simplified standard format [B.01.462(3)(a), Figures 25.5(B) or 25.6(B)];
  • the bilingual simplified horizontal format [B.01.462(3)(b), Figures 26.3(B) or 26.4(B)];, and
  • the bilingual aggregate format [B.01.463(2)(a)(ii) &(ii), Figures 28.5(B) or 28.6(B); and B.01.464(2)(a), Figures 30.5(B) and 30.6(B)].

In Step 8, Other Option 3, the linear formats [B.01.461(3)(c), Figures 31.1(E) and (F) or 31.2 (E) and (F)] or the simplified linear formats [B.01.462(3)(c), Figures 32.1(E) and (F)] and 32.2(E) and (F)] are applicable to foods for children under two.

5.16.6 Small Packages

Products with an available display surface of less than 100 cm2 are considered to be "small packages" and do not have to carry a Nutrition Facts table if the outer side of the label of the product indicates to consumers how they may obtain the nutrition information that would otherwise be required in a Nutrition Facts table on the label [B.01.467(1)]. (See 5.10 of this Guide.)

For foods intended solely for Children Under Two Years of Age, the nutrition information must be provided to consumers upon request, in the form of a Nutrition Facts table in a format that would otherwise be carried on the label of the product [as specified in B.01.461 to B.01.464] other than a horizontal format. The Nutrition Facts table must be shown in its largest version (i.e., in a version that is listed in column 1 of item 1 of any Part of tables in B.01.461 to B.01.464), according to the following Figures in Schedule L (CU2 = Children Under Two):

  • 20.1(E) and (F) - Standard Format CU2;
  • 21.1(E) and (F) - Narrow Standard Format CU2;
  • 22.1(B) - Bilingual Standard Format CU2;
  • 24.1(E) and (F) - Simplified Standard Format CU2;
  • 25.1(B) - Bilingual Simplified Standard Format CU2;
  • 27.1(E) and (F) - Aggregate Format - Different Kinds of Foods CU2;
  • 28.1(B) - Bilingual Aggregate Format - Different Kinds of Foods CU2;
  • 29.1(E) and (F) - Aggregate Format - Different Amounts of Food CU2; or
  • 30.1(B) - Bilingual Aggregate Format - Different Amounts of Food CU2.

5.16.7 Nutrient Content Claims

Nutrient content claims, including the criteria and labelling requirements for such claims, are discussed in detail in Chapter 7 of this Guide. Only those nutrient content claims relating specifically to foods intended solely for children under two are included in this section.

Only the following five nutrient content claims, from the table following section B.01.513, can be used for foods intended solely for children under two [B.01.503(2)]:

  • "source of protein";
  • "excellent source of protein";
  • "more protein";
  • "no added sodium" (or salt);, and
  • "no added sugars".

Vitamin and mineral nutrient content claims are permitted for foods intended solely for children under two, provided the foods meets the applicable criteria (see Chapter 7 of this Guide) based upon the recommended daily intakes for that age group [D.01.004, D.02.002].

A claim that characterizes the amount of starch in a food (e.g., "contains no starch"), is permitted on a food intended solely for children under two [B.01.502(2)(g)]. However, when a representation of the amount of starch is made on a label or in an advertisement, the amount of starch, in grams per serving of stated size, is required in the Nutrition Facts table [B.01.402(4)].

5.16.8 Health Claims for Foods for Children Under Two

Diet-related health claims, including the criteria and labelling requirements for such claims, are discussed in detail in Chapter 8 of this Guide. Diet-related health claims are not permitted on foods that are intended solely for children under two.

5.17 Nutrition Facts Information from Another Country

Only the Canadian Nutrition Facts table may be used to provide nutrition information in Canada. Nutrition labelling systems from other countries are not acceptable in Canada.

One objective of Canada's nutrition labelling regulations is to provide a standardized system for conveying information about the nutrient content of foods. Mandatory declarations, reference values and formats which differ from the one adopted by Canada make it difficult for consumers to compare foods at the point of purchase. These, therefore do not support an informed consumer choice for Canadians.

From the beginning of the development of the Canadian nutrition labelling regulations, compatibility with the system in the United States was a clear objective. However, emerging science, health concerns and differences in diet all limit the extent to which harmonization is possible. For example, the U.S. nutrition labelling regulations, passed in 1993, have not been updated to reflect emerging science (e.g., the nutritional importance of omega-3 fatty acids). Nor can the U.S. legislation reflect the consumer's experience with current U.S. regulations. In addition, differences in units of measure and bilingual requirements in Canada limit harmonization.

Some of the differences between the nutrition labelling systems in Canada and the United States include the following:

  1. Trans Fat: The trans fatty acid declaration is mandatory on Canadian labels. The declaration also becomes mandatory on the US label on January 1, 2006. On July 11, 2003, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a regulation requiring food manufacturers to list trans fatty acids, or trans fat, on the Nutrition Facts panel of foods directly under the line for saturated fat. However, the US did not establish a reference standard for the sum of saturated and trans fats or for trans fats on their own, thus no % Daily Value is declared in their table.

    NOTE:  Food manufacturers selling in the US have until January 1, 2006 to comply, although the FDA will allow manufacturers to implement the change immediately. For more information, see http://www.fda.gov/oc/initiatives/transfat/

  2. Percent Daily Value (% DV) for Mandatory Vitamins and Minerals: In both countries, vitamins and minerals must be declared as % DV. However, in the U.S., the % DVare based on the 1968 U.S. Reference Daily Intakes. In Canada, the % DV are based on the 1983 Recommended Daily Intakes for Canadians. There are differences in the DV's for 14 vitamins and minerals, including those for 3 of the 4 mandatory declarations for vitamins and minerals (i.e., vitamin A, calcium and iron).
  3. Protein: The U.S. requires a % Daily Value (DV) for protein when a food is destined for children under four years of age or when the protein is of low quality. The Canadian diet provides sufficient protein of good quality. Therefore, it is considered that a % DV for protein is not essential information for the consumer and, given the cost and complexity of determining this value, would put a needless burden on manufacturers.
  4. Rounding to Zero: In Canada, rounding rules for the declaration of nutrients in the Nutrition Facts table are in place to avoid a situation where a  total fat declaration of zero would be accompanied by a declaration of an amount of saturated and trans fats other than "0". This is a situation that would have been confusing for consumers. Therefore, total fat may be rounded to "0" only when the product contains less than 0.5 grams of fat and contains less than 0.2 grams of both saturated and trans fats (both of which would be rounded to "0" as well).
  5. Servings Per Container: The Canadian regulations allow for the optional declaration of servings per container, while it is a mandatory declaration in the United States. In Canada, a declaration of servings per container on the basis of "cups" or "tablespoons" is prohibited because the definitions of these measures in the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Regulations (CPLR) are in Canadian units [CPLR 33(3)]. It is expected that the CPLR will be amended to remove this barrier. While this will correct the situation for "tablespoon", the different measuring systems in Canada (1 cup = 250 ml) and the U.S. (1 cup = 240 ml) will persist.

5.18  Other Languages in the Nutrition Facts Table

The format and presentation of the Nutrition Facts table are specifically prescribed and there is no provision for the use of other languages within the table.

Although other languages are not permitted within the Nutrition Facts table, these could appear outside the Nutrition Facts table provided the Nutrition Facts table is shown in English and French on the label and the information in another language does not violate the Food and Drugs Act and Regulations, the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act and Regulations, or any other federal legislation.

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